Your Property is Being Rented out: Solutions

Q: I’ve discovered that my property is being rented out to other people for their holidays without my knowledge.  What should I do?

A: The approach you can take would likely depend on whether there is a letting and management contract in place between you (as the owner of the property) and the developer (or a party related to the developer, etc - for short we refer below to all such as the developer). In some such cases, the developer has the right to rent the property out.

If there were such a contract, and it entitles the developer to act as a lettings agent, then you should look to the contract to claim the rental income back from the developer: as an owner you would generally be entitled to it by default. If you would like letting without your prior consent to stop, then you need to request and negotiate an amendment of the contract in this sense.

Where a developer, etc, has no contractual right to let your property or the occupants have not been let in by such a letting agent acting on your authority, you should give notice to the occupants to vacate the property and we can advise further on the mechanism involved. In case any occupiers fail to comply, you may apply to a court to evict them and  claim compensation from them via the court for the unlawful use of your property.
 



Recent work:

Stopping the improper use of insolvency proceedings

A client of our dispute resolution team (led by Kamen Shoylev and Yordan Neshkov) was recently the subject of an indirect claim by a Bulgarian bank with which this client has been engaged in a multi-stage dispute. Unusually, the bank acted through a vehicle registered in an African state, which made an unfounded claim in the tens of millions of euros against our client and sought the commencement of judicial insolvency proceedings against this client. The offshore vehicle was chosen to isolate the bank from liability and create certain evidential difficulties for our client's representation.

NBLO succeeded in terminating the insolvency proceedings, with direct loss fully awarded to our client. A second claim to recover our client's indirect losses is currently under way.

Where targeted in this way through insolvency proceedings, a company may be prevented from trading properly (e.g., by suffering restrictions on its financing or being unable to participate in public procurement).

Through our considerable experience in insolvency litigation, both entirely domestic and where there are European and cross-border elements, we are ideally placed to assist clients in resisting such attacks and recovering the real and considerable losses that may be suffered.

© New Balkans Law Office 2020